Scanning Film with LaserSoft Imaging SilverFast (Podcast 709)

Scanning Film with LaserSoft Imaging SilverFast (Podcast 709)


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About six months ago I posted about my Rolleiflex F3.5 Twin Lens Reflex camera, and how the ability to develop film in broad daylight with the Lab-Box had contributed to a rekindling of my love for film. The Rollei was a replacement for my old Yashica TLR camera, which I still have, but the few drawbacks in its design and the difficulty and sometimes pure panic of working with the dark bags that I reported on around four years ago, had caused my interest in film to dwindle again for a while. The Rollei and Lab-Box have brought it all back around for me, so I will occasionally shoot film for the pure joy of it, and being able to come home and process my film myself is the icing on the cake.

Back in episode 690 I also talked about the scanner that I bought late last year because my old Epson scanner had given up the ghost. After a fair amount of research I decided to go for the CanoScan 9000F Mark II scanner, the main reasons for which are the ability to get very high resolution scans of my 6 x 6 cm medium format negatives on 120 film. As I shared last week, one roll gives me just 12 frames, and with developing costs etc. we’re talking a couple of bucks per photo, so it keeps you relatively careful about releasing the shutter each time, although I will, of course, still opt to grab a photo and throw it out if necessary, rather than hesitating too much about the cost.

Although I’ve been using SilverFast 8 to scan my film for the last six months, I realized last week that I had not talked about it here on the blog and podcast, so I’d like to do that today. I initially was not happy with the results I was getting from SilverFast 8 as I thought it was too grainy, but I’ve been able to get over that to a degree. What happened was a combination of various factors that actually did make my images too grainy, so I’ll briefly cover that too.

Basically, for some of my winter snow scenes, I was essentially over-exposing my images a little, because with digital I get better quality images by exposing to the right. As one of my incredibly knowledgable participants on my January Hokkaido Landscape Tour shared with me though, for film, you have to protect the shadows rather than the highlights, and therefore I find that I’m not exposing the same way with film and that is more important with snow scenes, because of all the white, although in general, my exposures were just about spot on.

The problem was compounded by the fact that I started to experiment with some other developing chemicals, and I guess I learned that you don’t experiment when shooting film on important shoots. I’d been using Ilford DDX, which is a very nice developer, but I tried Ilford Perceptol, and found it more difficult to get good results, but that was partly because some of my winter scenes were a little too bright. The main reason though, I’d come to find, was probably agitating the film too often during the development process. The Lab-Box tutorials said that you need to agitate more often, and more rigorously, which is what I was doing, but as I looked into the cause of my over-grainy images I found that this can cause more grain, and sometimes streaks on the images, which I was also getting.

I didn’t find this out though until I’d damaged a number of rolls of film, and also, on recommendation from a kind reader/listener, I made one last change, which was to switch my chemicals again, this time to Adox Rodinal. Although I liked the results I was getting with Ilford DDX, I was throwing it out occasionally because of the relatively short shelf-life. You also have to use much more of it, with a 1+4 mix ration, which helps with the shelf-life problem if you develop film often, but still, I found that I was both going through too much of it, and sometimes throwing it out because it had crystalized too much and basically gone off.

Rodinal, on the other hand, requires just a 1+50 mix, although I also got caught as I arrived at that. The one downside of Rodinal is that it takes quite a long time to develop your roll, so I initially tried working with a 1+25 solution, which halves the development time, but I also found that doing so increases grain, and that cost me another roll of photos. I finally arrived at working with Rodinal at 1+50 and halved the agitation during development. I had originally been agitating quite rigorously every 30 seconds, based on the Lab-Box tutorials, but I reduced that to relatively slow agitation every minute, and the results are finally what I was hoping for, and what grain I do sometimes see, is now very pleasing, natural film grain, and no vertical streaks.

One last thing that I did as well, although I’m going to try not doing this now that I’ve worked out all of the other kinks, is that I started to mix my developer with purified water, which is basically one step down from distilled water. I’d been using tap water, and I’m still not sure if that was a problem, but using the purified water may have helped. I’ve also considered buying a distilled water machine, but they aren’t cheap for a good one, and I’m not sure how important this is to the process. If anyone has an opinion on this, please let me know via the comments below.

Anyway, now that I’m getting the sort of results I wanted from my development process, and using Adox Rodinal, which can be stored for a very long time without worrying about shelf life, the results that I am getting with SilverFast 8 are very pleasing, but there it took me a fair amount of trial and error to get the results I’m happy with, so I’ll walk you through the process now. As you can see from the screenshot of the startup screen, you select your scanner on startup, and in fact, you have to bind your license to your scanner, and I’ve not really looked into how easy it is to change this later if you change the scanner, but hopefully that is possible and not a costly process.

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SilverFast Startup Screen
SilverFast Startup Screen

Somewhat uncharacteristic of me, I actually went for the cheapest version of SilverFast which is the SE version at €49. There’s a chart showing what you get with the higher versions and would have liked to try but don’t have access to is the Auto Adaptive Contrast Optimization. The other thing that might be of use is the Job Manager, but that doesn’t kick-in until the Ai Studio version which is €299 and I wasn’t willing to pay that much for this software. Everything you’ll see today is what I’ve got with the SE version.

I am setting my film into the scanner using the film holder that comes with it for 6 x 6 cm frames. Here is the photo from my earlier post to illustrate that. I load the film with the shiny side down, because the scan is performed from underneath the glass. There is a window in the lid of the scanner, but that contains a light source and a diffuser to soften the light source as it illuminates the film for the scan.


Scanning 120 Film with the CanonScan 9000F Mark II

 

Scanning 120 Film with the CanonScan 9000F Mark II

When I first started using SilverFast I selected the following settings in the Preferences > General tab, and after arriving at the settings I liked, I saved the tool dialogs as a preset here. You can update that with the floppy disk icon. Under the CMS tab I selected the Adobe RGB (1998) color profile, and that will be plenty as I’m scanning black and white images, so the lack of ProPhoto RGB doesn’t bother me here. I left the options under the Special tab at their default settings.


SilverFast General Settings

 

SilverFast General Settings

Most of the other important settings for my scanning workflow can be seen in this screenshot of the main scanning window. You can see in the top left corner that I’m scanning to TIFF files, and dropping the scanned images into a folder called Film Scans initially, in my home directory. I have the quality set to 300 ppi, and I’m scanning at 4800 ppi, which results in images that can be printed at 300 ppi at approximately 90 cm square but can actually be printed around twice that size at 150 ppi and still look great.


Scan Dimensions

 

Scan Dimensions

People often try to tell me that this resolution is too high, and while I agree that it’s a tad on the high side, my next lower option is 2400 ppi and that is not enough for my use cases, which often involve printing my photos out very large. I have tested in steps and found that there is an increase in detail up to 4800, but nothing more is gained higher than this. Also, keep in mind that the optics of your camera and how sharp the original photograph is all come into play here, so find your own maximum resolution, and work with that. I’m happy with 4800.

Picture Settings

Under the Picture Settings panel, you can easily adjust the midtones which affects the brightness of the image without shifting the black and white points. If you click on the N button that you there, you switch between Normal and Logarithmic modes, as necessary. I’ve used both depending on the photo, so it’s worth giving it a click sometimes if you aren’t getting what you want. If this was a color image, I could click the C button to introduce Adaptive Saturation which prevents over-saturation in more saturated areas of the image.

NegaFix

The NegaFix panel is interesting and provides a number of presets based on various film types. For example, they have Ilford Delta 100, which does a really nice job, and can, of course, be applied to other films. I generally leave this off and adjust the image myself later in Capture One Pro, because they tend to plug up the shadow areas a little too much for my liking, but these presets are definitely worth a play with. The CCR button that you see there is for Color Cast Removal, which does a good job of neutralizing the color.


NegaFix

 

NegaFix

It’s probably also worth noting that most of the time I leave the NegaFix options set to Other for the Vendor and Film type, and leave the ISO pulldown set to Linear. If the image is a little too pasty I sometimes use Standard instead of Linear, but I find it can be a little heavy-handed, so I go with Linear and then apply a tone curve to my liking in Capture One Pro. I prefer to keep that extra bit of control.


NegaFix Linear ISO

 

NegaFix Linear ISO

Unsharp Masking

Also note from these screenshots, that I’m reducing the amount of Unsharp Masking that I apply to the images as well. I found that the Automated Sharpness was a little heavy-handed as well, and not necessary with images from my Rolleiflex. My Yashica would need more sharpness though, so again, the settings you select really depend on the camera probably also the acuity of your film.

Densitometer

If we also take a peak inside the Densitometer panel which was closed in the first screenshot, and you’ll see that we can check the Black and White points, and although the left and right rectangles are both the same in this screenshot, as you make adjustments to your images in SilverFast, the right rectangle shows you the tones or colors for color film after the changes. The left rectangle represents your original film tones.


Setting Black and White Points

 

Setting Black and White Points

Also, you can click on the Pipette icon in the toolbar to the right of the sidebar, and set your Black and White points, and if necessary, the Neutral point as well, and Reset it all if necessary. I generally find that setting the Black and White points helps to get a nice spread of tones throughout the image.

iSRD

iSRD is a form of Dust and Scratch Removal. The important thing to note here is that it only works in 1:1 or HQ (High Quality) modes, and it requires a high-resolution infrared scan to get into that mode. Luckily though once you have that scan, you are done. You apparently don’t need to do another scan, as the software has all the information it needs at that point, but to be completely honest I have found this feature to be pretty buggy and actually never gone through with a scan using iSRD. Sometimes the preview looks great, but then I simply cannot get a view of the cleaned-up scan, and other times it takes so long to process, even with my 10 core iMac Pro, that I end up just coming out of iSRD and clean up my image manually in Capture One Pro later.

GANE

Another of the few features that I am disappointed in, and cannot get the SilverFast Support team to comment on, is the Grain and Noise Elimination. I personally think that this is just not working at all, at least not on Mac OS Catalina. Here, for example, is a screenshot of a dark area of an image that has a bit of grain in it. You can see from the bottom left corner that Grain and Noise Reduction is currently turned off in one image, because there is no tick in the box in the top right of its pane, and in the second image the check is on, supposedly apply Strong GANE. I’ve viewed this on a 32-inch display though, and I cannot see any difference. If anything, the image with Strong Grain and Noise Elimination applied is marginally grainier, but I think they are pretty much identical.

I’m not going to touch on the other features, which I don’t really use, but I should mention that the Auto CCR button on the top toolbar can do a nice job as well. It’s basically Automatic Image Optimization with Color Cast Removal. Especially when you first start using SilverFast, this can be really useful to see what it does and what is possible.

Batch Processing

I would like to finish by mentioning Batch Processing. Although I can only scan three images at a time, once I have selected the appropriate settings for each image, I go to the top toolbar and hit the Scan button, and select Batch Scan, which opens up this dialog box. Here I can set the folder into which my scanned images will be saved, and also give my files a name. I then provide a starting number and turn on Index active, and the software will then start at 01 and automatically increment that each time a scan is performed. When I’m doing an entire roll of 12 images I have to open this dialog four times, but I only set that number on the first batch, and it increments through to 12 automatically.


Batch Scanning

 

Batch Scanning

Once I save my images via the Batch Scan process, due to the way the images are saved from SilverFast, they are not editable in Capture One Pro. I have to open them in either Photoshop or Affinity Photo and save them again, even if I keep them in the TIFF format. Until I do that, none of the sliders in Capture One Pro are active so I cannot make any changes.

After saving the image files, I actually do one last thing, and that is to grab the script that I made six months ago that enables me to easily add EXIF data to my photos. As I shoot I use an App on my iPhone called FilmPad, which records the shooting data and time etc. and then once I’ve developed and scanned the film, I open up my EXIF Updater script, and hit number 1 to parse the folder of images, and then walk me through each image to add the camera and shooting information. I dreaded doing this manually with Exiftool before I created this script, but now I don’t have to look up or remember any commands. My script does all that for me. I just have to enter a few pieces of data in human-readable form.


MBP Film EXIF Updater Script

 

MBP Film EXIF Updater Script

I spend a few hours yesterday clearing up a few final bugs that I was aware of and will be putting this script up for sale in the coming days, so if anyone is interested in grabbing a copy, come back in a week or so and it should be available. I will also produce a post to explain how to use it so if you need a reminder, subscribe to our newsletters and I’ll let you know when it’s ready. The result, of course, is that my images are tagged with camera and shooting data, so my website shows EXIF data when you view the images, and also they show up at the right date and time in other image management apps.

Anyway, I hope you found this useful. I’m happy now that I have started using SilverFast, despite the few things that don’t really work well for me, and for the price of the SE version, I think I’ll continue to use it. Although the grain did bother me at first, as I explained earlier, my current scans contain much more organic film grain, as opposed to the Canon Software which basically smooths everything over and then resharpen, removing pretty much all grain, and that was perhaps too much the other way.

This post and podcast were not sponsored or endorsed in any way by LaserSoft Imaging or any other third party. I paid for the software myself and they don’t even know about this review at the time of publishing, although I will send them a link after release.


Show Notes

SilverFast Scanner Software: https://www.silverfast.com/scanner-software/en.html

Music by Martin Bailey


Audio

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Tokyo in the Shadow of the Virus on One Roll of Film (Podcast 708)

Tokyo in the Shadow of the Virus on One Roll of Film (Podcast 708)


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It has been a crazy month! I finalized my tenth fiscal year’s accounts with my Tax Accountant, and also visited a Judicial Scrivener to extend my position as the head of Martin Bailey Photography K.K. because apparently, here in Japan, you are automatically fired on the day that you hold the last meeting of the shareholders, which is me, but as these are official procedures, we have to document them, and in turn, file the appropriate papers. The funny thing is if I don’t actually go ahead and fire myself, and fail to visit the scrivener and pay him to reinstate myself as the CEO of my own company, I get fined around $300 by the government and my company is put into liquidation. Luckily for me, I work with a tax accountant that keeps an eye on all of these things for me, because without him, I’d miss all of these things.

Having also spent most of the last three months in self-isolation, spending my time working on a big update to my Photographer’s Friend app, I also have the remnants of that pesky little brain tumor to look after, and that means a quarterly visit to the hospital in the middle of Tokyo, so I figured it would be a good opportunity to push a roll of medium format film through my Rolleiflex, and see what I could do with Tokyo under in the shadow of the Corona Virus. Unfortunately, despite the countless negative aspects of the virus, like death and financial ruin, which I obviously do not want to belittle, it turned out to be a relatively pleasant trip into the city.

Sitting on the train in the morning rush-hour, rather than standing, sardine-style, was the first bonus. Many people continue to work remotely, and as you can see from this first photo of the ticket gates on the exit of the Onarimon Station, the number of people in transit is still very low, despite us now having our travel restrictions lifted. From June 19, we are once again able to travel between prefectures here in Japan, so the trains are starting to gradually fill again. I live on the border of what is essentially the state of Tokyo, with the neighboring Kanagawa Prefecture, and jumped into my car on the 19th to go and grab something from a store just over the border, and the roads were packed! I estimated that it would take me at least 90 minutes to run a ten-minute errand, so I swung the car around and went home. It wasn’t important to do it on that day.

Onarimon Station Ticket Gates
Onarimon Station Ticket Gates

As I walked up the stairs from the platform just before shooting this image, there was actually no-one around these ticket gates. It was completely surreal, but as I took the cover off my Rollei and set the exposure these people appeared from no-where, and still only accounted for probably 10% of the number of people I usually see going through these gates at this time of day, but the affects that the virus has had on Tokyo are pretty obvious, including the masks, although around half of these people would have been wearing masks anyway, even before the virus.

This next shot from a few minutes later was another rarity. I could have walked up this escalator unhindered, while usually there’s a person on almost every step. It was a nice chance to capture the metallic sheen of the sides of the escalator and the light radiating from the exit opening. On a technical note, at times like this, I am relying pretty much on the light meter built into my 56-year-old Rolleiflex, and I am always impressed with how accurate it is, even in conditions like this. I really like how we can see the detail in the dark steps as well as all the highlights as the scene gets brighter.

Onarimon Station Escelator to Exit
Onarimon Station Escelator to Exit

Before we go on, let me explain that I’m going to quickly go through all twelve images from the roll of Rollei RPX 100 film that I shot, but like this one, they aren’t all great shots. I’m going to share them all anyway, to show you my thought process and that really needs to include the lesser images as well. Here I noticed a sparrow jumping around on top of the walkway connecting the fourth floor of the hospital to another building. The sparrow is pretty much unrecognizable, just below the center of the frame, but I was literally struck by the fact that these tiny birds spend their days in the metropolis, so minute compared to their surroundings, and wondered if they realized that they lived in one of the largest cities on the planet. Of course, they don’t, but the scale struck me, to the point that I thought it was worth a frame.

Sparrow Lost in Space
Sparrow Lost in Space

I walked along to a window in the middle of the fifth floor, and shot the following two images. I was struck by how few people there were on the streets again. This isn’t a particularly busy area of Tokyo anyway, but when I first looked, there was a taxi and a truck, and just a few people. I also liked the vantage point, so I initially grabbed this frame.

Taxi and Turning Truck
Taxi and Turning Truck

After that shot though, a number of people did walk into the scene, though again it felt sparse, and almost baron, so I grabbed a second frame of the same scene. I timed it so that the person crossing the road in the foreground was in approximately the same location as the taxi in the first frame.

Few People on the Streets
Few People on the Streets

After a chat with my doctor and on my way to the pharmacy to pick-up my medication, I shot a few scenes that I’d noticed on the way to the hospital. As usual, the light had been better earlier, but I was already late and thought it better to leave these shots until afterwards. I’m still relatively happy with them though. Here I found the contrast between the older dark building on the left, with the newer light colored building on the right interesting, and the Mori Tower building peeping over the top of the building in the back.

Old, New and Newer Still
Old, New and Newer Still

This is the other side of the same building, and I was attracted to this by the rugged feel with the pipes and vents attached to the outside of the buildings. I don’t photograph the city often, but I do find these rugged industrial aspects appealing. Also, although I’m not a huge fan of grain, I find the grain that is visible towards the bottom of this image quite appealing. I’ve been using the Silverfast scanning software on recommendation from listeners following an earlier blog post, and although I had some initial concerns, I am pretty happy with the workflow and results now, so next week I’ll talk about that process a little.

Pipes, Vents and Buildings
Pipes, Vents and Buildings

I was reminded of that software by talking about the grain, because I had some images that were too grainy compared to the Canon scanning software, but as I get accustomed to the settings, Sliverfast does seem to provide quite pleasing film grain, rather than smoothing it over, as the Canon software does, and I think I’ve learned to appreciate this.

Here’s another angle of the same building, this time showing more of the pipes on the right side and more of the Mori Tower building in the distance. Again it’s the industrial feel of this shot that appealing to me, but I prefer the balance in the previous shot.

Gritty Tokyo
Gritty Tokyo

I then recalled the angles and juxtaposition of the two buildings that I shot square-on earlier, and walked back to shoot that, as you can see in this next frame. I found this appealing as I walked to the hospital, but had forgotten about it, not noticing as I walked in the opposite direction, and then I remembered to look back, and realized that I had forgotten this. I like the angles and again, the play between the darker older building and the newer lighter building.

Tokyo Contrast Juxtaposition
Tokyo Contrast Juxtaposition

It’s not very noticeable, but I was using an orange filter on the taking lens of the Rollei trying to darken the sky down a little, but this is the only shot in which I can really see the effect. I also like that the light meter built into the Rollei has an exposure compensation dial, so I can dial in two-thirds of a stop to compensate for the filter. Not bad for a camera that is three year’s older than I am.

As I turned, I saw the two similar staircases on this foreground and distant building, and grabbed a quick shot here too. Again I also like the light and dark, almost yin and yang style aspects here too. I cropped this in by around 15% on the top and left side to make it more symmetrical and to remove some annoying features on the top and left side. It’s nice working with the 75mm prime lens, which is the equivalent of a 50mm lens on a 35 mm system, but sometimes I have to crop in a little like this, but not often.

Layers of Buildings and Stairs
Layers of Buildings and Stairs

Back in the Onarimon Station, I was again surprised by how few people there were on the platform, leading to shot number eleven below. At this time of day this isn’t a busy station, but still, it felt overly empty due to the stay home policy in Tokyo, and general caution of the population here.

Onarimon Station at Midday
Onarimon Station at Midday

I used the last shot of the roll to get the train coming in to the station at Jinbouchou, that we would ride home through the city and out to the west where we live. At ISO 100 even at f/3.5 I was only able to get a shutter speed of an 1/8 of a second, so the train is blurred. I’d hoped this would turn out a little more artistic, but this is what I ended up with.

Train Arriving at Jinbouchou Station
Train Arriving at Jinbouchou Station

I kind of regretted using that last frame on the train as I saw an opportunity for a self-portrait as we went through the dark tunnels of the underground, turning the windows into mirrors, and the lack of people on the train made it the perfect opportunity, but I didn’t think it was worth putting a second roll of film into the Rollei, and even if I had, I would not have finished the roll, so I left it out.

I enjoyed giving myself this little project, as the limitation of the 12 frames to try and form a cohesive set of images is a nice challenge, and I also like to try and make as many decent images as I can. With digital I’m still a careful photographer, but when every frame costs a few dollars, especially when you consider the cost of chemicals as well, it makes you just a little bit more cautious.

I processed the film when I got home late yesterday afternoon, and scanned it in this morning, on Saturday the 27th of June, 2020. [For some weird reason I originally wrote September!] It’s strange that the development work that I am doing has turned into my main job, and the Podcast and Blog is being forced back to my weekend work, like when I had a day job until ten years ago. It’s probably going to stay that way for a little while longer though, as I try to get this latest release finished. I have have all but one feature completed, and I’m hoping to release Photographer’s Friend 3.5 in the next couple of weeks, so please stay tuned for that.


Show Notes

See my other film related posts here: https://mbp.ac/film

You can see the Silverfast scanning software that I’ll talk about next week here: https://www.silverfast.com

Music by Martin Bailey


Audio

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Loading 120 Film into the Rolleiflex 3.5F Camera (podcast 689)

Loading 120 Film into the Rolleiflex 3.5F Camera (podcast 689)

This is just a short video to show you the process of loading a roll of 120 medium format film into the Rolleiflex 3.5F TLR camera. Moving forward I will be releasing short videos like this as individual episodes like this, just as quickly consumed snippets of information. These will usually be in addition to a full weekly episode, so I hope you find this bite-sized information useful.

You can see all film-related episodes using this grid.

[ess_grid alias=”film-posts-grid”]


Show Notes

Follow us on Vimeo here: https://vimeo.com/martinbailey

Music by Martin Bailey


Video

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Rolleiflex 3.5F TLR Camera and Accessories (Podcast 687)

Rolleiflex 3.5F TLR Camera and Accessories (Podcast 687)

I recently picked up a Rolleiflex 3.5F TLR camera made two years before I was born, and have had a lot of fun researching and acquiring the accessories that I wanted for it, and, of course, actually shooting with this new camera, so today I’m going to share my findings with you.

If you are firmly in the digital camp, then this episode may not be of much interest to you, but keep a mental note of it and come back when the time is right. Unlike the rapid-paced update cycles of our digital camera, the camera I’m going to talk about is at this point 54 years old, making it two years older than me, so the technology isn’t exactly going to be outdated if you come across this post a few years or even a few decades from now.

I’ve actually been hankering after a Rolleiflex camera for many years. Before I bought the Yashica-D twin-lens reflex camera that I showed you in my recent video about developing film with the Lab-Box, I had spent time in Map Camera, my favorite camera store here in Tokyo, dreaming of picking up one of these wonderful pieces of historic German engineering. Well, with the Lab-Box having reignited the fire in my passion for film, and having checked out my friend Brian Wood-Koiwa Rolleiflex during his recent visit, I figured it was time to jump down from the fence I’d been sitting on.

The Rolleiflex 3.5F with Original Box

I had also been periodically checking the Map Camera website for a good condition used Rolleiflex camera, and noticed one recently that I couldn’t resist. For the same price as two other Rolleis the one I bought still had its case, a strap, the original diffuser, and the original box and user manual, whereas the others had just a strap, which is relatively common. Although I wasn’t able to see the actual quality of the camera beforehand, I bought it online, as Map Camera gives you a month to return or exchange the camera if there is anything wrong with it, and when buying from them, even used cameras come with a one year warranty, which is comforting when buying camera gear.

Rolleiflex 3.5F with Original Box
Rolleiflex 3.5F with Original Box

I probably paid more than you might expect to pay for a similar camera in the US, having dropped the equivalent of around $1,880 at the current exchange rate, but with all the accessories and warranty I’m happy enough with the price. I only paid around $200 for my Yashica-D on a flea market mind, so this was a difficult conversation to have with my wife, despite this being essentially a business expense for me, as I’m using this camera in my work.

Leather Case

As you can see, the camera comes with its own protective leather case that is extremely well-made. The front section just clips on to the main case and can be removed when shooting, leaving just the case around the camera, and the strap attaches to the case when it’s on the camera, or directly to the camera when you take the case off. The manufacturers really seem to have left nothing out when it comes to details.

Rolleiflex 3.5F with Leather Case
Rolleiflex 3.5F with Leather Case

You can also see the lens cap in this photo when attaches to the top viewing lens via the same bayonet that you attach filters to, and then as you rotate it into place, it clips into the taking lens at the bottom. When you take it off, it folds into the size of one of the disks, so it can be stored easily.

To focus and compose with the Rollei you flip the top viewfinder enclosure up, to expose the ground glass screen that you can see in this next image. There is a split circle in the middle of the screen that aligns when the subject is in focus and gradually shifts apart as the subject moves away from the focus plane. To enable you to see this there is a magnifier built into the cover which drops down parallel to the screen and I actually find it easier to both focus and compose using that magnifier, but being able to work at a distance as you see in this photo also has its benefits.

The Rolleiflex 3.5F Viewfinder
The Rolleiflex 3.5F Viewfinder

For example, I was able to make this shot in Shinjuku recently by holding the camera out at arm’s length, pointing downwards, and although the slow shutter speed of a 1/15 of a second rendered the moving people blurry, the photo is pretty sharp still. In general though, because of the way you hold the camera a 1/15 of a second shutter speed doesn’t seem to be a problem. I’ve been loading ISO 100 film mostly, so my shutter speed in the shade has been on average only around a 1/30 of a second.

Spiral Staircase
Spiral Staircase

The downside of shooting at arm’s length though, as well as the fact that you are viewing a relatively dark screen, is that it’s difficult to really grasp what’s in the frame, so I missed the person entering the frame at the bottom here. It’d have preferred it if they were not there, but I’m learning to accept the imperfection that film and this kind of photography brings, and I am actually really enjoying that aspect.

54 Year Old Light Meter

I also wanted to show you how the light meter on the Rolleiflex works. If you look at this photo, you’ll see two needles and a red zone. The straight needle, near the red zone in this photo, represents the meter reading of the light in front of the camera. If that falls into the red zone, it means that the available light is too low for accurate metering. To set the camera to an appropriate combination of shutter speed and aperture, you simply need to adjust both settings until the straight needle aligns with the circle in the top needle.

The Rolleiflex 3.5F Light Meter
The Rolleiflex 3.5F Light Meter

The light meter is responsible for moving the straight needle, and changes to both the aperture and shutter speed move the top needle with the circle on the end. Unless you need to compensate for back-lighting or for a snow scene etc. there really isn’t a lot to think about or mess up. The manual states that once the meter reading is so low that the needle is in the red, the meter becomes somewhat unreliable. Relatively little light will get you out of that red zone though, and so far having shot and processed three films almost completely with the built-in meter, I have found it to be very accurate.

Depth of Field Scale

Another ingenious feature of this camera is the depth of field scale. If you look at the above image again, you’ll see a white area to the right of the number 3, just above where it says FEET. That is the amount of the image that will be in focus at that focus distance. As you focus further out, that white area expands to represent the actual depth of the focus at any given distance. Having developed my own Depth of Field calculator for our Photographer’s Friend app I realize that this isn’t difficult to calculate but the fact that they were able to build that mechanically into the focus dial of a camera 54 years ago is astonishing to me.

ISO and Exposure Compensation Settings

Rolleiflex 3.5F ISO Settings with Exposure Compensation
Rolleiflex 3.5F ISO Settings with Exposure Compensation

Of course, the other parameter that affects exposure is the ISO of the film in use, and the Rolleiflex takes that into account when calculating exposure. Here you see the ASA and DIN dial, and ASA is basically the same as our current ISO standard, so you can see here that I have the dial set to 100, as I have an ISO 100 film loaded right now.

You can set the ISO from 12 to 1600, and I actually have some ISO 25 Rollei RPX film that I’m going to be trying next week. Apparently it has beautiful shadow detail, and the low ISO will help me to get some long exposures for some seascapes that I’m planning. I have also found a place here in Japan that makes filters that can be attached to this camera, so I’ve ordered an ND8 and ND400 filter, as well as a polarizer filter.

You may think the polarizer is redundant on black and white film, but it will still quite naturally darken the sky and remove reflections from water and metallic surfaces, so I figured it wouldn’t hurt to get one as I was having some made. Unfortunately, they will not arrive in time for my upcoming seascapes trip, so I’ll be taping some NDs to the lens hood for long exposures then.

Also, note the dial above where it says ASA 100 in this photo, that I have set to 1.5. That is essentially the Exposure Compensation dial. If you use a filter, for example, a medium yellow filter to bring out the contrast between clouds and the sky, you have to dial in around 2/3 of a stop compensation. You can also use this to calculate the shutter speeds of up to a 3 stop neutral density filter.

The light meter itself is the line of small lenses that you can see below the large ROLLEIFLEX title on the top of the front panel. The camera came with a white diffuser strip that covers these lenses and enables you to take an incident light meter reading by pointing the camera towards the light source. I haven’t shot like this so far, but I will be trying this in Hokkaido in January for my landscape tour, and I’ll report back if there are any idiosyncrasies to note.

Aperture and Shutter Speed Settings

You change the aperture with the left dial on the front, between the two lenses, and change the shutter speed with the right dial. This position puts the main controls right at your fingertips, or rather I should say thumb tips when holding the camera. The shutter button in the bottom right corner is perfectly positioned below your index finger, and there is a safety switch, to lock the shutter button when you aren’t shooting, to prevent you from accidentally pressing it.

Holding the Rolleiflex 3.5F
Holding the Rolleiflex 3.5F

In the bottom left corner, which is the right side of the above photo, there is a flash-sync socket, and this actually works to fire my Profoto studio lights, so I can shoot with strobes if necessary too. The read-out for the aperture and shutter speed settings is in a small window on top of the top lens. The aperture for this model ranges from f/3.5 to f/22, and the shutter speed ranges from 60 seconds to 1/500 of a second. You can only automatically release the shutter down to 1 second though. If you set the camera lower than 1 second you have to use a cable release and time the amount of time the shutter is kept open yourself. The 2 to 60-second scale is really just for metering purposes, but it’s pretty amazing that the camera does that.

The switch with the V and the left-pointing arrow in the top left of this photo is the flash synchronization and self-timer switch. If you pull that lever down before releasing the shutter, you get an approximately 10-second timer before the shutter releases, so you can use this camera for selfies as well!

Close-up Filters

Rolleiflex 3.5F with Rolleinar 3 Close-up Filters
Rolleiflex 3.5F with Rolleinar 3 Close-up Filters

The minimum focus distance of the Rolleiflex 3.5F is relatively long at around 1 meter or just over three feet. To overcome this Rollei made three close-up filters called simply Rolleinar 1, 2 and 3. The number 1 filter gives you a focusing range of 39 1/2 to 17 3/4 inches or 100 to 44 cm. The number 2 filters enable focusing from 19 3/4 to12 1/8 inches, or 50 to 30 cm, and the number 3 filter is from 12 1/2 to 9 1/2 inches or 32 to 24 cm.

A rough guide for the usage of these filters is, if you want to shoot just a head and shoulders shot of a person, the Rolleinar 1 will get you close enough. For just a face or head-shot, the Rolleinar 2 will work, and to just about fill the frame with a single large flower head, you’d need the Rolleinar 3. I have managed to find a good quality copy of each of these close-up lenses and used them now in the field too, but I have not yet developed the two films with shots made with them on, although from what I’ve seen so far, the image quality looks absolutely fine, if not very good with these filters fitted.

As you can see from this photo of the Rollei sporting the Rolleinar 3 filters, the filter itself on the bottom taking lens is not that big. The filter on the top viewing lens is larger and pointing down slightly to help correct the parallax shift that occurs as you focus close to the camera. I’m still not sure how accurate this is, but looking at the line of sight when shooting, I imagine they’re doing a pretty good job. Again, I’ll know more once I’ve developed my recent two rolls of film having done some close-up work over the last few days.

Color Filters

I managed to find an old leather case with the Rolleinar 1 and 2 close-up filters at a local camera store in Ginza, here in Tokyo, as well as a number of colored filters, and I got a Rolleinar 3 online, which was in excellent condition, so I’m pretty much set now. The color filters that were included, as you can see in the photo below, are light green, a light red, a light yellow and orange. The light red filter renders reds lighter and blues and greens darker. The Orange filter does the same but not to quite a large degree. The green filter renders yellows and greens lighter and reds and blues darker so it’s great for darkening skies and lightening grass and foliage in black and white landscape shots. The yellow filter is also good for increasing the contrast between clouds and a blue sky.

Rolleiflex 3.5F with Rolleinar Close-up and Color Filters
Rolleiflex 3.5F with Rolleinar Close-up and Color Filters

You’ll also see the R1 filter in that photo, which is apparently a UV filter, but it doesn’t really do anything on the Planar lens version of this camera which I have, so it’s really nothing more than a protector for me, should I ever need one. I wasn’t able to split up the set though, and the price I paid was reasonable just to get the two close-up filters and the color filters, so that’s no big deal. The set also contained a metal hood, so I wished that I’d found that first, as I bought the first of the two along with the camera and paid a pretty penny for it.

Saving the First Frame

I also wanted to mention that I figured out how to stop losing the first frame when processing my film in the Lab-Box that I shared with you in episode 682. I had been following the instructions by the manufacturers, both in their manual and videos they’ve created, but the amount of film that they pull out of the light-tight chamber with the film in it, to attach the metal clip, will always result in losing a frame.

Loading the Lab-Box
Loading the Lab-Box

I thought I could avoid it by changing how I load the film, to gain some leeway at the end, but that isn’t possible, so I tried simply removing the tape and backing paper from the film without advancing it at all and attached the clip to the short tab of film before closing the Lab-Box lid and winding the film onto the spool, and that worked. If you use a Lab-Box and want to keep all twelve frames of a roll of 120 medium format film, you can’t pull the film out of the chamber any more than you see in the above photo, regardless of what you’ll see in videos, etc, including my own from a few weeks ago.

Tenba Skyline 12 Bag

I’d like to mention one last thing, and that is how difficult it was to find what I consider a good bag for this equipment. I must have spent a total of three hours online and a good hour in each of two separate shops, totaling five hours until I found a bag that I felt worked well for this gear. My goal was to find something simple that I could fit the Rollei in with its case on, and the accessories that I’ve picked up, as well as some additional film and some space, to put in my wallet if necessary.

Most of the bags I found were adequate but had things like space for an iPad at the back, or they were a little too big, or too heavy. Others had really gaudy inner linings or were simply way too expensive. I don’t mind paying for a quality product, but I saw some bags in this class as high as $700 for a camera bag, and that, even to me, is way over the top. It’s a personal decision of course, but I personally cannot warrant that kind of money for a bag, and I actually still didn’t think the ones I saw were a good match.

I finally decided on this Tenba Skyline 12 bag, that cost me around $70 here in Japan, and I see that it’s around $55 on B&H Photo. I can’t say I’m overly in love with the bright blue lining, but I can live with it, and the design is exactly what I wanted otherwise. It’s simple, with just the right amount of space and number of pockets and pouches. When I go out just with this camera this is all I want to carry, and with this bag being as light as it is, even with my Rollei and accessories inside it weighs very little. I can easily carry this around all day without getting tired.

I’ve included a number of photos here to illustrate how I’m using the bag, including dropping in my light meter sometimes to help with exposure. As the Rollei incorporates a light meter, I am referencing that most of the time, but occasionally I’m finding that I need to get a spot meter reading from something like a bright object against a dark background, and it just helps to have the separate meter.

The only thing that I wish was different is that the strap is fixed to the bag and cannot be removed, so I had to buy a rubber attachment for the strap to stop it sliding off my shoulder. Just the nylon strap alone would not stay put, so I had to pay extra for the attachment. I am very happy with this bag and think it’s a great match for the Rollei. If I come across something better I’ll update you later, but I’m happy enough with this combination that I don’t intend to actively look anymore.

Gallery of Images

Here to finish is a selection of images that I’ve shot on November 29 and 30, 2019, to give you a feel for the sort of work I’m doing with this camera. It’s a little different than my digital work, but I would like to think that there is still plenty of Martin in these, and I definitely don’t want to be the sort of photographer that falls in love with the process, and shoots film purely for the experience and totally ignoring the need to actually think about what I’m shooting. Just being recorded on film doesn’t make the image special, and I want to keep that in mind as I do more of this work.

Capture One Pro 20 Released!

Before we finish, I’d actually like to point out that my photo editing software of choice, Capture One Pro, just received a major update and has been released this week as version 20 with some exciting new features. I’ll be creating a video to walk you through the new features soon, but check it out for yourself at www.captureone.com and download the trial version if you don’t already use Capture One Pro. Your photography will thank you for it.

OK, so we’ll finish up there for now. Let me know if you are enjoying these film-related episodes, as I do plan to bring you a few more film-related topics from time to time.

Film Related Posts

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Show Notes

Get Capture One Pro 20 here: www.captureone.com

Check out other film-related episodes: https://mbp.ac/film

Music by Martin Bailey


Audio

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Download this Podcast as an MP3 with Chapters.

Visit this page for help on how to view the images in MP3 files.


Urban Weird Photographer Brian Wood-Koiwa (Podcast 685)

Urban Weird Photographer Brian Wood-Koiwa (Podcast 685)

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I’m really happy to be able to bring you an interview today with my friend Brian Wood-Koiwa, a Tokyo-based urban fine-art photographer. He has lived/worked and traveled around the world in places such as Qatar, Ecuador, Thailand, Australia, and as a Peace Corps Volunteer in central Africa, before settling down in Tokyo, where he has been living for over 17 years.

Brian Wood-Koiwa with his Rollei
Brian Wood-Koiwa with his Rollei

He calls his photographic style “Urban Weird”, celebrating The City by emphasizing the beauty and “un-beauty” of the seemingly urban mundane and banal by incorporating the literary concept of New Weird (and its ancestor Decadence) in conjunction with the Japanese aesthetic philosophy of Wabi-sabi, centered on the acceptance of transience and the beauty in imperfection. The physicality of his focus encompasses anything urban (urban landscape, cityscape, street, urban abstract) inspired by the contrast of the ultra-modern and traditional aspects; at times existing harmoniously and others not so harmoniously – but interestingly.

I took the opportunity of having Brian in my studio to shoot a few portraits of him, of which this is my favorite. As you’ll hear, Brian is relatively quiet and unassuming, yet his tartan pants and “As If” t-shirt are, in my mind, undeniably flamboyant, and I mean that in the most positive way. These things suit Brian’s character, and his dry sense of humor are things that I appreciate as some of the wonderful reasons that I consider him a friend.

As our conversation was not scripted, I do not have text for the rest of this post, but here are the questions that I posed to Brian forming a framework for our discussion. Please listen with the audio player above to hear how the conversation developed.

  • Tell us how you came to live in Japan?
  • How did you get started in photography?
  • What’s your main photographic genre?
  • You have a passion for film photography. Tell us more about that?
  • We both have a pretty good appreciation for Wabi-Sabi, which is the Japanese concept of beauty in imperfection, and your thinking surrounding Decadence and Banality is fascinating and thought-provoking. Tell us a little more about that.
  • Talk through your three images (below). Tell us what you were aiming to achieve etc.
  • Can you give us three pieces of advice for anyone that wants to shoot compelling street photography like yours?
  • I often recommend your private street photography tours to my guests that come to Japan for my winter tours, and I’ve heard nothing but good things about them. Tell us more about what you get up to when someone books you for say half a day or a day?
  • Where can people find you online?

You can find Brian’s work, publications, and services at http://urbanweirdphotography.com

Here is a direct link to one of my favorite photos of all time, on Brian’s website: https://urbanweirdphotography.com/prints-street/clandestine

This is also a favorite: https://urbanweirdphotography.com/prints-street/the-red-umbrella

Here are the three images that Brian referenced during our conversation.


Show Notes

Check out Brian’s website and street work here: http://urbanweirdphotography.com

Brian’s Instagram is here: https://www.instagram.com/urbanweirdphoto/

Music by Martin Bailey


Audio

Subscribe in iTunes to get Podcasts delivered automatically to your computer.

Download this Podcast as an MP3 with Chapters.

Visit this page for help on how to view the images in MP3 files.