The Stamen Have It!

The Cherry Blossom Comes and Goes for Another Year (Podcast 736)

In this week's post, I share ten images of the cherry blossom close to our Tokyo apartment from last week, with details of my thought process.

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Martin Bailey
Martin Bailey is a nature and wildlife photographer and educator based in Tokyo. He's a pioneering Podcaster and blogger, and an X-Rite Coloratti member.
8 Comments
  • Bruce McDonald
    Posted at 14:01h, 01 April Reply

    Martin, I’m really enjoying the thought processes of your “antics” as it gives me some new ideas and at times validates my own experimentation/experiences. I’m still using an android phone so the best I could do is pass on the details of PF to a photographic colleague. He is now embarking on a PF journey.

    • Martin Bailey
      Posted at 15:36h, 01 April Reply

      Thanks for the comment Bruce! It’s great to hear that you find these posts useful.

      I’ve started to study the software and programming language to make an Android version of Photographer’s Friend, and although it will take a number of months, it’s now in the works. I’ll let you know via the blog when it’s ready to go! ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Ulana Switucha
    Posted at 11:06h, 02 April Reply

    Hi Martin. Beautiful images and interesting process to read about. Looking forward to the sake cup series.

    • Martin Bailey
      Posted at 10:05h, 04 April Reply

      Hi Ulana,

      Thanks for the comment and kind words. I’m definitely going to make time to photography some of my cups, and probably some of my wife’s other crockery. We have some nice stuff, but I want to do it justice, so I’m thinking of how best to do this. I have a few ideas so we’ll see how it pans out.

      Regards,
      Martin.

  • Jan Wagner
    Posted at 07:09h, 05 April Reply

    Hi Martin, nice to see these photos. Also great to read and learn about your process which is always so deliberate and well thought out. Very recently I have been selling my used gear and getting ready to purchase the R5. I sold my two 5D Ml IV bodies and I’m in the processing of selling off all of the Nikon Z gear that I have used the past two years. I kept and plan to use my EF 70-200mm f 2.8 and (what was most often my go to lens with the Mark IV) the EF 100 – 400mm for awhile rather than forking out the bucks for the RF lenses. Your thoughts? Thanks, Jan

    • Martin Bailey
      Posted at 10:36h, 06 April Reply

      Hi Jan,

      It’s great to hear from you! Thanks for the comment and kind words.

      Working with EF Lenses on Canon mirrorless cameras is pretty painless, and the image quality actually seems to improve slightly, not that it’s poor on EF mount cameras. The one thing I would strongly recommend though, is getting the mount adapter with the control ring built-in (https://mbp.ac/ccrma). I map the ring to directly change my ISO, which enables fine tuning of exposure while looking at the histogram in the viewfinder. Because it’s built into the adapter it works with all of your EF lenses.

      For me, there is an incentive to migrate quickly, so that I can report on my findings with the new lenses, but otherwise, taking your time switching is a sound plan. The overall size reduction that comes with using native RF lenses does become quite an attractive proposition. Sometimes the lens itself isn’t much smaller, but not using the adapter shrinks the overall size of the system quite a lot. Due to this, I actually decided for the first time since 2001 that I would no longer use the battery grip with my cameras, and I’m enjoying the much more compact format. It makes traveling easier too, when we’re able to, of course.

      One other thing to keep in mind, is that there is possibly a higher resolution EOS R5s (or whatever the name will be) in the works. Canon Rumors have been sharing information on this for a while now, and it looks as though there will be an announcement from Canon anytime now. They are saying 80MP or thereabouts. This may not be of interest to you, but if higher resolution is appealing, keep your eye out for that. I personally cancelled my order for a second EOS R5 in favor of the higher resolution body. The R5 is currently the best camera Canon has ever made, and for fast-paced shooting it will probably remain so, but I can see my having one of each so that I can work with the R5s for landscape etc. although with a 12fps that is also being touted, I would probably shoot wildlife with the higher resolution body as well. I’m a sucker for resolution though, so as I say, don’t worry about this if you aren’t. ๐Ÿ™‚

      I hope this helps some. Stay well Jan.

      Regards,
      Martin.

  • Luc Renambot
    Posted at 00:16h, 28 April Reply

    Looking forward to the cups.
    Have you ever been to ‘mingeikan’, the Folk Crafts Museum in Tokyo?
    Been a couple of times and always enjoyed it.

    https://mingeikan.or.jp/

    Luc

    • Martin Bailey
      Posted at 11:17h, 28 April Reply

      Hi Luc,

      Thanks for the comment. I’m planning the cup shoot at the moment and will get to it very soon.

      I’ve not been to the Mingeikan, which now you’ve pointed out to me is somewhat embarrassing as I lived in Meguro for ten years. ๐Ÿ™‚ I am in need of a good Indian curry or Yakitori from my old neighborhood, so as soon as we get this poxy pandemic under control I think a visit is in order. Thanks for the link!

      Regards,
      Martin.

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