More on Mood; Fleeting Moments (Podcast 39)

More on Mood; Fleeting Moments (Podcast 39)

Last week I spoke about capturing or creating mood or atmosphere in your images, either by being at the right place at the right time, fore example to make the most of certain weather conditions, or by using technology and other props, either at the time of shooting, or in post processing. Today, I’m going to talk more about shots that to me have mood, or provoke a certain feeling, but that really could probably not be recreated very easily or rather, they could not be recreated at all for one reason or another.

As most of you know, I’m not a great portrait photographer, but I do shoot environmental portraits when I’m out and about if faced with an opportunity. One thing I’ve noticed, though this is no big secret, is that people are general pretty spontaneous. The faces or the actions and stances of the people in the images I’m about to share with you could very probably not have been conceived in advance, and probably not captured in the same way, with the same mood, had they been say hired models, dressed and brought onto a set or to a certain location. In fact, I personally would just never have bothered to make these images had they not presented themselves to me under these circumstances.

Let’s take a look at the first example. It’s image number 109. This was shot with my old 28-135mm lens at F5.6 for 1/125th of a second. The ISO was set to 100. I had visited the city of Narita, near the Tokyo International Airport, which for some reason little be known to me is in the Chiba Prefecture, two hours from Tokyo by train. In July each year they hold the Gion Matsuri, which is a kind of festival that goes on for three days. I had gone to the festival hoping to get shots just like this one. Incidentally, this shot was used along with four other shots of mine in an exhibition held in Italy, organized in collaboration TrekEarth. I don’t know if I mentioned this before, but TrekEarth was actually conceived and is owned by a good friend of mine from way back when, when I lived in northern Japan. I’ll drop a link to the site in the show notes. If you want to go on a photographic tour of the Earth with literally 100’s of thousands of images, you might wan to go and take a look.

Summer of '03 - Gion Matsuri #8

Summer of ’03 – Gion Matsuri #8

Anyway, getting back to the first shot for today, I was standing on the walkway that goes the whole way round the main temple in the grounds of Narita San, a temple complex in the middle of the City, and I noticed these five young ladies walking across the paved area towards to main doors of the temple. It’s customary in Japan to throw a few coins in a box at the main doors of the temple, sometimes you’ll clap your hands to attract the attention of the gods, and then pray. These girls were about to do that, but walking along in the heat of the day in their “Yukata”, a kind of summer kimono, and drinking their crushed ice drinks, I can imagine they didn’t have a care in the world. This was almost three years ago now, and these five young ladies will be older, and getting closer to the pressures of adulthood, but at this point in their lives, I get the impression that they were really just enjoying the day, enjoying each others’ company, and probably making the sort of laid back summer memories that will stay with them forever. I love this shot, and I am really pleased that I was there, with my 10D in my hand, with the right settings, ready to capture this particular moment in these five girls lives.

As I said, some fleeting moments are really just that. They could be recreated to a certain extent, but they’d never be the same. If I paid these young ladies a fee and asked them to walk across that paving, they would have become self conscious, and their expressions would have been different, and the shot would have been lost. Not to mention the technical difficulty of actually getting the paved area free of other people like this, which, in itself is quite rare during the three days of the festival.

Walking Proud

Walking Proud

The next shot I want to talk about, number 146, is actually the alley to the side of the main walk up to Sensoji, a very famous temple in Asakusa here in Tokyo. This is another spontaneous moment. I titled this image “Walking Proud”. As you can see the woman in the Kimono is walking along, full of confidence, and looking like she could break down buildings if she felt like it. I shot this once again with my 10D with my old 28-135mm IS lens, at 56mm. The aperture set to F7.1 and a shutter speed of 1/350th of a second, with the ISO at 400. At first I was disappointed that the image only existed for a moment in a cluttered sense, with the guy with the newspaper, and the other people all around getting into the shot. After I looked at the image at home later though, I found that I quite liked the overall mood of the shot, with the woman in the Kimono kind of cutting her way through all of these people going about their daily lives. I cropped the top of the shot a little as it was just more of the roofs of the buildings and a little overexposed, due to the fact that the alley is quite dark. The overexposed areas were distracting. So sure, there are things about this shot that I would like to have changed, but on the whole, as fleeting moments go, I’m quite happy with it.

The next shot, number 153, was shot on the beach at Kamakura, the place with the giant statue of Buddha that most tourists to the Tokyo area seem to make their way to. These three girls tried two or three times to get a photo of themselves with the sand in the background. They were obviously not happy with the initial results, squealing with laughter having checked the LCD and trying again. The guy in the background on the surfboard is a little annoying, but I couldn’t bring myself to clone out a whole human being. I also don’t mind it that much as a secondary element to make me think a little more about the scene on the whole. The girls though are again enjoying a moment in their lives that will probably stay in their memories for a long time, especially as they’ll have the photos to prove they were there. This too was shot with my 10D and the 28-135mm IS lens. The aperture was F8 and the shutter speed 1/200th of a second at ISO 100. Regrets for this shot are that I would like to have perhaps been a little further to my right so that I could get more of their faces in the shot, but that would have changed the angle, and we would not be able to see the lens of their camera, so may not have worked anyway.

Cheeeeeese!!

Cheeeeeese!!

For the next shot, number 532, we graduate to my 20D, for another spontaneous moment, which for me is simply magical. This was shot during a family photo session at a wedding in the Meijijinguu shrine near Harajuku in Tokyo. Now, I don’t know what had tickled these ladies funny bones, but they were having a right old giggle about something. The bride though, in her formal wedding kimono is trying very hard not to laugh too much, giving in to just a smile. I was shooting through people for this shot, and ended up cropping in tightly on the two outer ladies for balance, but in general I really was quite happy with this shot. There are some distracting elements in the frame though, and as the subjects were all in a straight line in front of me, I wished I’d opened the aperture up to around F2 with my 50mm F1.4 lens to throw more of the background out of focus. As it was, I shot this at F4.5 for 1/160th of a second, at ISO 400.

Meijijinguu_Wedding_2975

Weddings in Japan can be quite formal, almost suffocating sometimes, but despite this one being held in one of the most famous shrines in Japan, with all the formalities, for me, I got a distinct feeling that this was a wedding where close friends and family members can relax, enjoy each others company, and once again, make memories that will last. I just hope the official photographer captured this moment too, as it’s a real pearl.

Visit to the Temple

Visit to the Temple

The last shot I want to look at for today is number 366. Back to the 10D for this shot, and I was using the 100-400mm lens for this one. The ISO was set to 200, for 1/15th of a second at F8. To be honest, looking back at this shot, I don’t know how I hand held at this speed, even though the focal length was a 100mm. If I recall, the original is a little soft, but I am pleased I went with this speed as it allows us to see a little movement in the man’s right leg as he climbs the stairs with his little girl.

This man, judging by his clothes is probably a dentist, and has taken some time out during his lunch break, as it was 1:15PM when I shot this, to take a walk to the local temple. At the top of the stairs we can see the over exposed temple they are walking towards, as I was metering for this father and daughter at the time. The temple being overexposed is a little annoying, but it also to me signifies that light or hope that this man could be looking for in his religion. I love the way he decides to take along his small daughter, and they climb the stairs together towards their goal. The daughter is probably too young to know much about the Buddhist religion, and probably as doesn’t yet even care. What she does care about is getting some of her busy dad’s precious time, to take a walk to the temple to break the monotony of her day. She’s almost certainly too young for this time with her dad to remain in her memory, though I could be wrong. If this is a rare thing, she may take the memory of this day into adulthood. Whatever the case, I’m once again pleased that I was at the foot of these stairs, with my camera. Although I’d have preferred to have had the camera on a tripod, I managed to scrape a reasonable shot out of the situation, and again, captured a moment in time in some people’s lives to bring a smile to my face when I view it.

I wouldn’t say that all of the shots I’ve talked about today will provoke feelings in all of you. But hopefully you will be able to appreciate why I chose these images to discuss mood. These kind of fleeting moments in peoples’ lives are often precious and lasting. I hope you enjoy looking at these images too and learning how I came about them as much as I enjoyed shooting them and looking at them now.

If there is anything that you can take away from today’s Podcast, it is probably once again the need to be ready with your camera to make the best of any situation that might present itself to you. Fleeting moments, are just that. They last but a moment and they’re gone. True happiness in peoples’ faces or in their posture and actions is often something that cannot be easily reproduced, or as I said earlier, probably not something that we could conceive during the planning stages of a shoot or a day out with our cameras. All we can do is to make sure that your camera is turned on and around your neck or in your hand ready to shoot. I know that the 2 second delay that my 10D took to power up used to have me half pressing the shutter button while walking around, making sure that it was awake and ready to go at the blink of an eye.

I remember loosing shots that still haunt me today while driving through India on a business trip and not being able to stop the car, but also not being able to catch the moments in some scene’s that went past the car window in less than 2 seconds as we drove by. The technology has now caught up with our needs. The 20D and now the 5D and the new DSLR’s from Nikon too, all power up in a tiny fraction of a second. There used to be a problem of shutter lag with compact digitals, that is the time it took from depressing the shutter button to the actual image being shot, but I believe now is almost as none existent in compact digitals as with Digital SLRs. Of course, this was never a case with film cameras anyway. So basically, whether you use film or a DSLR bought within the last two years or so, we now have the tools to capture these moments. It’s now down to us as image hunters to get out there and see the moments, and have the instinct to put our equipment to good use.

So I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s episode. I definitely enjoyed putting it together as always. There are three pieces of news to share with you before we finish today. The first is that today, on May the 30th, 2006, we reached the 300th member at martinbaileyphotography.com. Apart from the odd spammer who’s account I didn’t have good reason to delete, generally every one of the 300 members is a vital part of the community and plays a huge part in keeping the forum a pleasant, constructive and fun place to hang out. If you haven’t visited yet, please swing by the forum at my Web site and sign-up if you have a minute. As I mentioned recently, if you have any friends or family that are interested in photography, please send them a link to the Web site or Podcast page and hopefully get them interested too. The more people listen the more worthwhile this all is, and the more incentive I’ll have to continue to invest my time into creating the Podcast.

Also, if you have a Web site, last week a kind listener mailed and asked me for a button to place on his Web site to link back to mine. I will create more, but if you also wouldn’t mind placing a link on your web site, the buttons are now available for download with some sample HTML code in the forum. I’ll add a link to the show notes to the related post.

And finally, another listener called Rick has been giving me excellent feedback on how to improve the site for Pocket PC use, where the relatively small form factor and slow download speeds can be a little restrictive or at best cause frustration. In reply to Rick’s requests I recently created a Podcast “Light” page, that is linked from the top of the main Podcast page if you want to bookmark it. Also last week following more feedback, I created a new page for viewing the large images when you click the thumbnails from the Light page. This new page contains no EXIF shooting data, comments, film strip or shopping cart, but it does have the added feature of being able to click through all the images I’m talking about freely using the left and right arrow buttons below the full size image. I like being able to do this so much that I also added a small text link to the images on the Light page below the thumbnails on the standard Podcast page too. Once you have clicked one of the links, you can move through the full size images freely in the same way. Note that the actual thumbnails on the main Podcast page still link to the full display page with the film strip and comments, and the shopping cart to buy prints. Along with the streaming player that you can launch from my site that will change the thumbnails in a timed slide show, allowing you to click the thumbnail to view it as I talk about each shot, there are now a number of different ways to view the images along with me in addition to iTunes. Remember that I cannot produce timed slide show type iTunes shows until Apple release a Windows version of their chapter tool. I will start to create them as soon as it’s possible, but for now can only apologise for the lack of this feature. Hopefully though you’ll be able to find a way of following along that suites you, from all of the methods we now have.

Oh, and one last thing, it will be the start of June by the time many of you listen to this, so it would be great if you could vote for this Podcast on Podcast Alley. You can do this by adding your email address in the Podcast Alley Vote section on my Podcasts page, and clicking the vote button. It will help to increase interest in the Podcast if we can get a decent placing.

Thanks once again for listening, and for all your support and suggestions, and for the kind words that keep coming in via the forum or from the Contact form on my site. One last reminder to be sure to check your email address when registering at the Web site or sending me a mail via the Contact Us form, as I’ve recently started receiving more and more mail delivery errors due to incorrect email addresses.

Anyway, with that, I’ll sign off for today. What ever you’re doing this week, have a great time doing it, and a great weekend coming up. Bye bye.


Show Notes
Music from Music Alley: http://www.musicalley.com/

Audio

Subscribe in iTunes for Enhanced Podcasts delivered automatically to your computer.

Download this Podcast in MP3 format (Audio Only).

Download this Podcast in Enhanced Podcast M4A format. This requires Apple iTunes or Quicktime to view/listen.



Capturing and Creating Mood (Podcast 38)

Capturing and Creating Mood (Podcast 38)

Mood, or atmosphere is often an intangible substance or feeling that can sometimes be difficult to put into words, and often even more difficult to capture on film. Today I’m going to talk about some of the occasions that I think I’ve captured the mood as it was and for what reasons. I’ll also mention some shots that have a good start, but the mood was enhanced by using some other technology, either when shooting or in post-processing.

A while ago, I made a list of images that I’d like to talk about at some point in this Podcast. I jotted down the image number and a possible title or theme for the Podcast. Recently I was looking through the list and I noticed image number 8, with the theme, just one word “mood”. I started to look through my gallery to see if there are any other images that I could talk about to help backup what I might say, and came up with a series of images that made me feel the mood of the shot, for one reason or another.

I thinned the list down a little after my initial pass through them, but while doing so I noticed a few things once I got a fair number of images in my list. Basically, I can pigeon-hole shots with mood into two categories. One is visual mood, caused by say having mist, or some other visual element that invokes the feeling of mood or atmosphere, and the other I’ll term implied mood. I’d say that the visual mood, even if involving natural elements like mist or fog, might perhaps be more easily planned than the mood captured in candid shots of people for example. Sure, you could hire models and get them to do something that would relay the sort of mood that I’m thinking of here, but you actually might not be able to conceive the scene or situation in the first place, without stumbling upon it. I guess this is part of the luck aspect of being at the right place, at the right time, with the right equipment, turned on and ready to go. The scene may only exist for a split second, and can never be re-enacted exactly the same again. Now, having said that, I’ve split my list of images, and next week will talk more about those that match the latter part of what I’ve just said, that is, images that really only exist for a moment in time, and could not be recreated without considerable or at least and unreasonable amount of effort.

My list of the first type of images, using natural elements or other tools at our disposal to create mood, starts with that first image I thought of, number 8. If this is the first time you’re listening to this Podcast, you can view the images on my Podcasts page at martinbaileyphotography.com, among other ways. I explain how to view images in more detail on occasion, so if you’re stuck, listen to a few of the other Podcasts first and you should hear a better explanation.

Misty Morning

Misty Morning

So, shot number 8 called “Misty Morning” was shot in 1992, in Nottingham, near my home town in England. I was home for Christmas. This was one of the few times that I’ve been home for Christmas during the total of 12 years or so that I’ve lived in Japan since 1991 and the guy in the shot is a friend, a Japanese guy that had gone back to England with me for the holidays.

Unfortunately, for pretty much the entire 10 days or so we were there, the Nottingham area was enshrouded in a real pea-souper. The fog just didn’t let up, and the only time we saw the sun was during a couple of days that we spent in London, a couple of hours South of Nottingham by car. This basically meant that the usual view of the City of Nottingham that should be sprawling out in front of my friend in this scene, is not visible, but it also gave me an opportunity to capture a moment in time with mood. This was shot with my old 35-105mm lens, that I soon replaced having switched to digital, and using Fuji Velvia positive film. I don’t recall the shutter speed or aperture settings. In the resulting shot you can see that the branches of the tree near my friend in his almost silhouetted form are a little pale as the mist cuts out their light. You can compare them with the branches and twigs on the tree in the foreground that occupy the top right of this image. These branches are much darker and have more contrast against the background.

This to me at least, all adds to a somewhat solemn mood in this image. If you didn’t know the background, you’d probably look at this and start painting in your own ideas about this man standing looking out into the mist. Is he wondering about a lost love, or thinking about other troubles? There are lots of things that could spring to mind, but I’m sure none of you are imagining him thinking, “Wow! I can’t wait to get to the pub tonight and have a few drinks with my mates” or, “Ooh, I can’t wait to get home and open my Christmas presents”. You will probably be thinking solemn, sad thoughts. This is because of the “mood” that the fog and this lighting lends the shot.

So, on the subject of light, and this shot is a somewhat more subtle example, let’s take a look at image number 722. This shot of a mother and child, both peering out of the Tipu Sultan Palace in Bangalore, India, has a different kind of mood. The surroundings gives them a kind of regal look, but I imagine these people surveying their domain, maybe even feeling lucky to be here. I get a serious, yet happy mood from this image. I’m thinking that the reason is probably coming from the fact that there are no lights in this building, and the only ambient light is entering the building from front, lighting the front of the subject’s faces, but quickly dropping into shadow from their cheeks to the totally shadowed back of their heads. This is enforcing the mood, or the feeling of them looking out, surveying their domain. I think I’m also getting a warm feeling from the shot because of the warm golden and brown colours. This was shot in October 2005 during a brief visit to India, and I was using my 24-105mm F4 L lens at 105mm. The ISO was set to 400, with the aperture wide open at F4, and a shutter speed of 1/20th of a second. I myself was halfway down a staircase when I noticed these people peering out from the balcony, and snatched a quick shot before the broke their pose. You’d probably also think that they were in this position for a long time, once again, down to the mood of the shot, but the reality is they stopped for just a short while, and moved on.

Mother and Child

Mother and Child

Next let’s talk about things that we can do to increase the mood of a shot. First, while shooting, there are often things that can be done to change the appearance of the final image. In episode 35 of this Podcast we went on a virtual tour of the Chichibu Cement Factory. The last image I spoke about in that Podcast was image number 981, and I’d like to revisit that image again today.

Sunlight Pours In

Sunlight Pours In

As I said in episode 35, this is one of my favourite shots right now, so forgive me for harping on about it, but I wanted to reiterate while discussing mood that I actually walked into this scene, scuffing my feet against the dusty concrete, to raise the dust that you can see helping to make the pillar of light entering from a hole in the corrugated steel above. Without this dust, the rays of light flooding into the window would not have been visible, yet they add so much to the mood or atmosphere of this shot. So I guess the take away here would be, if you are shooting in a darkened room, with light flooding in, sometime it will be visible, but on occasion you may need to use something at your disposal to make it visible. Now, I personally don’t do any studio shooting, other than still lifes with a small setup, so I’m not sure what sort of tricks studio photographer’s have up their sleeves, but I have seen machines that make smoke for example. I think the machine I saw actually makes bubbles and all sorts, but that would probably spoil the mood a little. Anyway, rather than buying a machine, you could perhaps light a cigarette, if you smoke yourself, or get someone to puff a few lungs full into the scene if this is an option. Dry ice or incense sticks might also be an option, and I’m sure there are lots of other things that can be used. If this is not your profession, get inventive with what you have at your disposal to make that ray of light stand out. It will probably improve your shots by adding a little, I’m going to say it again, “mood”.

In the next shot, image number 729, we can see more rays of light, this time natural, cause by bright sunlight shining through a break in the clouds over the Chuuzenji Lake in the mountains at Nikko in Tochigi Prefecture, Japan. This shot again made with my 24-105mm F4 lens, at F8, with a shutter speed of 1/640th of a second. The ISO was 100, so you can see that this was a pretty fast shutter speed, throwing the line of trees along the center of the shot into silhouette, and most of the shore and small promontory very dark. Also, the clouds in the sky are very dark and heavy looking, almost daunting.

Chuuzenji Lake

Chuuzenji Lake

There are a number of reasons why I picked this shot out to talk about mood. I think the boat, moored on the shore in front of the promontory adds to the atmosphere. This may be nothing more than my interpretation, but from the boat I get a kind of peacefulness. It’s as if the work is done for the day, and the owner of the boat is now at home soaking in a bath after a days work, or sitting in front of the TV with a glass of sake, reading the newspaper. In addition to that, we have this dark looming sky, looking like it could rain heavily at any minute, but then there’s the ray of light, like a ray of hope, keeping the feeling of rain at bay for a while, and overall restoring the balance to the calm, peacefulness that I get from the boat.

The next shot, number 380, was shot I think, if my memory serves me correctly, on the very day that I bought my 50mm F1.4 lens. I dropped it onto 10D on the bus on the way back from the camera store, on the 22nd of May, 2004. Wow! That makes this lens two years old this week. What a coincidence! Anyway, I literally just dropped the lens onto the 10D and snapped off two or three frames in the bus. I wasn’t particularly thinking about the results, but when I got home, and looked at the images, I found that I liked the everyday, nothing-out-of-the-ordinary type feel, or the mood of the shot. But it was lacking something. I wanted now to make something of the shot, so I fired up Fred Miranda’s Black and White Workflow Pro plug-in in Photoshop. I’ll drop a link to Fred’s online shop into the show notes for this episode, but basically this plugin allows you to make a vast array of black and white images, with lots of variations, such as this rich sepia effect. For this particular image I’d applied the Red filter, which gives the effect that a deep red filter would have on a black and white image, not making the image red, and I then chose the Tritones, Sepia, Dark Effect options. Now I must admit, I don’t use this filter as much as I used to these days, more often now going straight into the tritons or duotones in Photoshop for this sort of effect, but it does make creating sepia or black and white image very easy.

Number 98 Bus to Tokyo Station

Number 98 Bus to Tokyo Station

One thing that I did pay a little attention to when shooting this image was the fact that you can see the driver in the rear-view mirror. I feel that this adds to the shot, but making it this rich sepia colour really throws us back in time, with a very retro feel to it. If we imagine the LCD with the bus stop name above the rear-view mirror to be one of those old bus signs that are stenciled in a sheet of waxed canvas or the like, and also don’t think too much about the rounded car body shapes in front of the bus, we could probably pass this image off for being thirty years or so ago. At least that’s the way it makes me feel, because of the mood given by the sepia effect.

So basically here, what I’m saying is, try making your image black and white, or sepia, and you might find it adds a different atmosphere to the shot than it would otherwise have in colour. Remember, there are many ways to create black and white images, and I won’t go into these today, but one thing you should not do is simply use the de-saturate option in Photoshop. I recently said, again in the Chichibu Cement Factory Podcast, that I de-saturated the image a little. By this I meant that I reduced the saturation, but Wayne, one of the major contributors on my Web site soon pointed out that we should not use desaturation of course meaning for black and white shots though. Sorry for the confusing terminology Wayne, and thanks for pointing it out. Wayne did point us to a great tutorial on the photoshopuser web site, about converting to black and white using the Channel Mixer in Photoshop. There’s a video tutorial, so if you are interested, there’ll be a link in the show notes.

Shinagawa Oasis

Shinagawa Oasis

Finally today, let’s take a look at image number 985. This is an example of changing the mood or atmosphere of an image totally, at the time of shooting it. This is a little oasis in Shinagawa, just outside of the Canon S Tower near the Shinagawa train station, shot with my 24mm TS-E lens. Tilt-Shift lenses allow us to change the focus plane of an image to at the most extreme, run almost down the very center of the image as though project straight out from the lens, as opposed to being parallel to the film plane. For more details of this, listen to Podcast episode 13 on using a Tilt-Shift Lens for Surreal Images. As I went into a lot of detail about using a Tilt-Shift lens in that episode, I won’t go into it again today, but rather from the artistic thinking behind this shot.

Firstly, the sky and building are over exposed, but I chose this shot over better exposed shots because I feel it enhances the overall surreal look that this lens gives when the focus plane is adjusted to run down the center of the frame. I also corrected the buildings leaning in with the lens in some other shots, but again chose this one over them, as it keeps us in a surreal atmosphere not possible with a normal lens. The trees and a few people at the bottom of the shot are well exposed, and this is the focal point of the shot. You’ll see that the lens has forced the trees either side of the path quite far out of focus, and the buildings to the side are really quite fuzzy. Now, this probably isn’t a moody shot in any way, but the atmosphere is definitely not normal. I’ve used the technology which is the TS lens at shooting time to give that image an atmosphere of it being somewhat out of this world, like looking at a tiny model of the world, rather than a real scene with real trees and real people. This is also helped by having the natural shape of the trees in amongst the angular buildings of Tokyo, which is why I titled this image Shinagawa Oasis.

There are probably a lot of areas that I have not, and really cannot touch on today, with regards to creating mood. In the second shot, of the mother and child in the palace in India, I mention the lighting on the subject’s faces. As I said, I don’t do studio work, but I’m sure there are techniques for changing the mood of portraits by lighting them in a certain way. Maybe by lighting from one side only, through the other side of the face into shadow. I’m sure you’ve all at some point help a torch under your chin in the dark, so as to light your face from the bottom. This makes for a very scary look indeed. Most definitely not flattering, and I would not suggest running out and trying this in your work, but what I’m saying is that lighting also plays a big part in the mood, even in studio work. If anyone that does do studio work and would like to share information on this or any other related topic, please post it in the forum at martinbaileyphotography.com.

So that’s about it for today. Although they will not be directly linked, as I said in the introduction, I’ll probably do another episode next week as a loose follow on to this, with examples of capturing mood in a fleeting moment that can really not be recreated again without going to great lengths, if at all. Unless that is, something happens over the next few days that makes me postpone this theme until a later date.

Also, remember that the new assignment on “Rainy Days” is now open for submissions. If you are not already aware of this, please listen to episode number 37 for details. There’s still plenty of time to get out shooting, and prepare something.

Thanks very much for listening, and have a great rest of the week, and a great weekend, whether you’re out shooting, or whatever you’re doing. Bye bye.


Show Notes
Music from Music Alley: http://www.musicalley.com/

Audio

Subscribe in iTunes for Enhanced Podcasts delivered automatically to your computer.

Download this Podcast in MP3 format (Audio Only).

Download this Podcast in Enhanced Podcast M4A format. This requires Apple iTunes or Quicktime to view/listen.