Big Tree and Fresh Leaves

Podcast 270 : The Therapeutic Power of the Creative Process

In July of 2009, I wrote a blog post called "Being in the Zone", in which I relayed my thoughts in relation to something that Richard Annable, an amazing wedding photographer from Australia had said in an episode of the Shutters Inc. podcast. In the podcast the question was posed...

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Martin Bailey
Martin Bailey is a nature and wildlife photographer and educator based in Tokyo. He's a pioneering Podcaster and blogger, and an X-Rite Coloratti member.
5 Comments
  • Anthony Sinagoga
    Posted at 02:46h, 03 December Reply

    Hi MB,
    Just love the podcast, it’s very inspirational and helpful and I fantasize about starting my own podcast.
    Something immediately came to mind as you were speaking about being in the zone while laminating your prints, but not being in the zone while sitting at the computer. I believe there is something to the physical act that contributes to being in the zone. I found it myself very clearly. When I’m physically moving I can easily get in the zone, when I’m sitting stationary it rarely happens. The act of moving your body is very much connected here. Maybe that’s why you can enter the zone while out photographing, you are physically participating in the process. I have experimented with light painting and I feel a different connection to those images because I am more directly part of the process. In this case, moving the little flashlight during the exposure.
    Let me know what you think. Excellent podcast!
    Anthony Sinagoga

  • Martin Bailey
    Posted at 11:45h, 04 December Reply

    Hi Anthony,

    Thanks for the kind words. Don’t just fantasize about doing your own podcast, it’s not that hard. It takes dedication to continue doing it every week, but technically it’s not so difficult, so you should try! 🙂

    That’s an interesting observation about getting in the zone while moving. I’m sure it’s different for everyone. I personally end up there even if I’m photographing from a totally stationary position, so I’m not sure I’m the same.

    There actually has been a study done on this. Marisa posted some great information here: https://martinbaileyphotography.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=4486#p33527

    Cheers,
    Martin.

  • Ken Witt
    Posted at 06:13h, 08 December Reply

    Hello;

    I am new and intermittent listener as time and work permit. I appreciate your views and insights. Thanks for putting in the time it takes to share with the rest of us. This week’s topic of being in the zone relates to a concept trumpeted by Sir Ken Robinson. He has spoken at TED a couple of times (http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html) and produced a book called The Element. The Element talks about finding your personal zone where you personally thrive. Sir Ken believes that everyone has an ‘element’ and that the discovery of whatever that is for you is where you will become who you want to be. “The Element” is a good read/listen. I believe you have found your ‘element’ in photography. Congrats, and keep it up.

    — Ken Witt

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