Reflecting on 2019 and Looking Forward to 2020 (Podcast 691)

Reflecting on 2019 and Looking Forward to 2020 (Podcast 691)

As I sit in my studio on New Year’s Eve, 2019, writing the post for the last Podcast of the year, I’m feeling somewhat overwhelmed as I reflect on the year, and try to figure out where the last twelve months have gone. My plan for this post was to share my personal top ten photos for the year, but by the time I’d finished writing what I expected to be a few short paragraphs of reflection, I found myself with a full episode, so I’ll share my top ten next week.

2019 wasn’t a bad year, but as 2018 ended, I remember telling myself that 2019 was going to be better, and it was, although I was hoping it would be much better, not marginally. You might recall that I had issues in Morocco in 2018, both with the bullies on the Customs gate, and with a mysterious illness that knocked me for six towards the end of the tour, and kept me from doing anything at all for two full weeks after I returned home.

We never did find out what it was, but it took a seven-day course of antibiotics to rid me of the cough and congestion, and I was still as week as a kitten when we finally got rid of it by around the end of the first week of December. A doctor would later look at my blood test results and tell me in hindsight that I should have been hospitalized. I was really ill, my wife and I both knew that, but the doctor that I did see apparently didn’t have it in him to read my blood test results.

As weak as I felt though, here in Japan, it’s customary to clean the house before the year ends, so that we leave our dirt in the previous year and enter the New Year clean. One of my main jobs in this period is to clean our windows. I’m somewhat embarrassed to admit that I only clean our windows once a year, at this time, but like the elderly Japanese men that make their wives cry by saying thank you very seldom, it’s always really nice to see the crisp winter sun shining through our freshly cleaned windows as we wind down for the year.

I was so weak at the end of 2018 I recall really struggling to clean my windows, and I really only started to get my strength back as I embarked on the first of my three winter tours here in Japan. I’m setting off for the first of the 2020 tours in less than a week now, and I am looking forward immensely to meeting this year’s groups and spending some time with Brian Matiash on our Landscape Tour, which is going to be a blast. I intend to take my new Rollei TLR camera and a box of film too, and I hope to get some nice medium format shots of the winter landscape, as time allows.

The tours went great in 2019 as did my Namibia Tour in May, and I’d looked forward to spending the second half of 2019 completing my new Mentorship system, but a number of hiccups prevented me from completing the final steps, so that’s coming in the Spring of 2020 now. Despite my not planning an autumn tour to make time to complete it, that time ran away from me due to various personal issues. I’m not going to go into detail, but let’s just say that the mid-fifties for turned out to be very tough on my wife and I as we came to terms with getting older.

I’d also had a runny-nose after my Moroccan malaise, and thought it was some kind of allergy, until a hospital visit between my second and third winter tours resulting in us finding out that I was leaking cerebrospinal fluid. It turns out that there’s a hole in my dura mater left by the brain tumor that I had surgery to remove nine years ago, and the coughing in November and December had torn the wound from the surgery at the back of my nose, allowing the fluid to leak out.

The doctors wanted to operate to block it up, but I asked them to get my historical yearly MRI files from their main hospital and when I returned from my third winter tour an inspection of the files shows that I’ve been leaking CSF for around five years now, and I’ve been fine, the main problem was the tear from the coughing, which I opened up myself, so I figured I could also close it up, and so that’s what I did. I took it easy for a few months, and by April the leak sealed itself. That was a bit scary again for a while, but all is good again now, so nothing to worry about. It’s going to take more than a hole in my brain to stop this photographer from enjoying life to the full.

I did learn a few things from this last year though, and apart from the importance of not coughing too hard and too often, I learned that I need to spend more quality time with my wife, and I also learned that my time management skills are going to pot. There’s probably a disorder name for what I have, but I tend to work way too hard on projects that I dream up, and they completely consume me until I reach a point where I can back off from them again.

My latest project started around 10 days ago and has pretty much kept me down-periscope until today. I was working on a shell script to update the EXIF data in images that I’ve shot on film and scanned into my computer. I am relatively accustomed to updating EXIF data with ExifTool by Phil Harvey but remembering the commands and keeping snippets for the various things that I do is tedious and error-prone.

I decided to write myself a shell-script so that I could easily recall commands and apply changes to my scanned film images, but after writing that for a day, I had something that I realized would be useful for others shooting film, and the following nine days disappeared down a black hole as I wrote over 500 lines of code to enable the script to ask the user for answers to some generic information about themselves, like their name and camera model etc. and then store that in a file for future use, before moving on to ask information about each individual image.

MBP Exif Updater
MBP Exif Updater

The script now traverses a directory of images and asks for shutter speed, aperture, and ISO information as well as focal length, date and time and then embeds the information into the EXIF data before automatically moving to the next image. There are a few finishing touches to be coded, but I intend to start selling the script for a small payment over the next few days, so stay tuned for that if you shoot film and have been looking for an easy way to input your shooting information. I know that there are other tools available, but none of them work the way my new script does, and I personally prefer what I’ve created, so I hope others find it useful too.

Back to my point though, I am going to back off from this for the next day or so, to ensure that I enjoy the year-end and New Year celebrations with my wife, especially as I’ll be leaving her alone as I travel with my winter tour groups, and that’s always somewhat stressful for her as well.

As I’m talking about my wife, I wanted to mention one last thing related to my reflection of the last year, and that is that someone emailed me during the year to say that they were disappointed about the fact that I’d said that my wife isn’t able to help much with my business. They felt that I’d been unkind in my remark because there must be ways in which she helps me. I sent a detailed reply spelling out the reasons for the comment, but didn’t receive a reply, so I wanted to mention it here in case that person is still listening, but also, in case I happened to offend anyone else with my remark.

I’d basically said that I’d really like to be able to hire someone to help out because my wife can’t help with much of what I do. To hopefully avoid misunderstanding, I wanted to add that my wife cannot use a computer. She can send text messages on her phone and knows how to use some of our electronic appliances better than me, but when it comes to computers, she is not able to use them, at all. I’m not saying that to put her down. I’m just stating a fact. And it’s that fact that prevents her from being able to do many of the tasks that I would like to get help with. Financially, I’m still not in a position to hire anyone full-time, but if I was, realistically why would I hire someone that cannot use a computer when 90% of the work I need help with is performed on a computer?

Having said that, in my brevity I upset this particular listener by not going on to say that there are things that my wife helps with and that I am incredibly grateful for. She keeps our receipts in order to take them to our accountant. I have to input the information into our accounts, as that’s a computer job, but she makes sure that they are all in order and nothing is missing. On the rare occasion now that I do a commercial shoot, she does a great job of helping me to set up studio gear, and there is a certain amount of paperwork that we do each month that involves handwriting documents. Although I can read and write Japanese, her hand-writing is much neater than mine, so it always looks better if she does this. We pay her a part-time salary for her time and I do really appreciate the work that she does, so I’m sorry if anyone else thought I was disrespectful with my comment.

I do wonder if this person had listened to many other episodes though. I would hope that a long time listener would also have heard me talk about how much I respect my wife’s opinion on my images. When I have an important image selection process to complete, I always ask her opinion before finalizing the edit. She is not only impartial, but she also has a great eye, and most importantly, she is not afraid to tell me when something sucks. In any creative pursuit, it’s vitally important to have a trusted critique to provide advice, and in my life, that is one of the rolls that my wife is great at.

Having said that much, I should also go on to say that she’s also my best friend. We have long talks, which we both enjoy, and she sometimes makes me laugh so hard that we both end up crying. And sometimes she is so deep and profound, that we once again both end up crying. If I ever made anyone think that she’s anything less than amazing and the most important thing to me on this planet, then I apologize, and I assure you, it was purely unintentional. Unfortunately, like my late father, I sometimes have trouble talking properly because of the foot that ends up in my mouth a little more than most people.

Anyway, we’ll wrap it up there for this year. I hope 2020 brings us all everything that we hope for, and more importantly, that we and our loved ones enjoy good health throughout the year and beyond. All the best!


Show Notes

Music by Martin Bailey


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My 2014 Top Ten Photographs (Podcast 455)

My 2014 Top Ten Photographs (Podcast 455)

Following on from last week, when I walked you through my selection process, this week I’m going to tell you a bit about the 10 photographs that I selected as my 2014 Top Ten.

Before we jump in and start to walk through my top ten, I’d like to thank all of you that posted a link to your own top selection for the year against last week’s podcast about the select process. It was great seeing your selections, and I encourage anyone else that is thinking of going through this process to post your link too, either against this, or last week’s post. I look forward to seeing more of your work.

OK, so here are my 2014 Top Ten images. Remember these are my selections based on the process I explained last week. You might not think they’re my best photos, or even any good at all, but that’s not really what this is about. This retrospective is really about putting a stake in the ground at the end of each year, and building a baseline from which to judge our progress each year.

I’ll go through these in chronological order, starting with this photo that I called Waiting for Clearance (below). I shot this and the next few photographs during my winter wildlife tours in Hokkaido, the northern-most island of Japan. On this day we were having a wonderful snow storm, and the wind was high, so the cranes seemed to just float above the crowd for a while as they looked for a spot to touch down.

Waiting for Clearance

Waiting for Clearance

I had been panning with the crane in flight, and not really paying much attention to the cranes below, so I actually had a bit more room above the crane which I cropped off making this a 16:9 ratio. I could have probably moved the camera down some to include more of the cranes below, but something about the end result here just appeals to me. I guess this is one case when, for me at least, the appeal of the photograph overrides the need for any perceived requirement for compositional conformity.

My next selection is this tightly cropped photo of a Steller’s Sea Eagle from the start of February. Again, technically there are a few reasons why people might not like this. The face being in shadow is one, and some people are probably going to complain about cropping off the tip of the wings, or the entire right wing in this instance. Personally, I’m finding more and more that I prefer a really tight crop like this, and often go in much tighter on eagles and birds in flight, aiming for just this look.

Search for Prey

Search for Prey

I like this particular image also because of the background. I have lots of eagle shots with vivid blue skies, which I actually don’t really like very much in normal photography, but here, the dappled texture of the mountains over the fishing town of Rausu where we photograph these eagles makes a nice background in my opinion.

I called my third selected image Angel Wings (below), because these wings remind me of the wings that you often see on angels in the movies. I have fond memories of laying on the snow at the edge of the Kussharo Lake with some of the other photographers on my tour, just waiting for swans to rise up and flap their wings like this.

Angel Wings

Angel Wings

Although I wasn’t impressed with the 5D Mark III auto-focus on the 200-400mm lens for birds in flight, it’s still very capable of snapping focus quickly onto a target like this when there is really not a lot of time to focus and grab a few frames while the action lasts.

Steller's Sunrise

Steller’s Sunrise

Again, the swans in the foreground bug me just a little bit, but I find the image appealing all the same, and so went for my feeling about the image over technical accuracy. After all, the swans are all in this water together, and my photo depicts that accurately.

This next photograph is a Steller’s Sea Eagle sitting on a pinnacle of sea-ice with the rising sun behind it (right). This was towards the end of Tour #2 for 2014, and again, I recall the excitement as the skipper of our boat moved us slowly back and forth so that all of my group got a chance to shoot this while the eagle remained perched up there.

I decided not to adjust the white balance on this, I generally shoot in the Daylight preset, and that helped me to maintain some of the blue feel of the cold dawn ice, because this is really how it feels.

This is also one of the few times that I actually use Aperture Priority shooting mode. Although I usually shoot Manual, at this location at dawn, we sometimes shoot away from the sun, but because we also sometimes shoot directly into it, it makes more sense to allow the camera to adjust exposure. I generally dial in about +2/3 of a stop, and run with that for about 20 minutes as the day starts, then go back to Manual as I feel much more comfortable in Manual mode.

Next we jump seven months of the year, from the end of February to the end of September, and this photo called Jewel on the Shore, from my Iceland tour (below). It doesn’t seem like that long ago when I talked about this, but I was really happy with this photo. I was set up with an ND filter on, doing multiple second photos of the sea water as it washed up the beach, sometimes coming up to my ankles as I worked this scene.

Jewel on the Shore

Jewel on the Shore

This was a 4 second exposure too, but I ended up shooting this while the sea water wasn’t high up the beach, as the sun shone perfectly through a gap in the larger growlers, which is actually a technical term for icebergs about the size of a car. The name comes from the sound they make as they roll along the hull of a ship. I couldn’t believe my luck as the light hit the small piece of clear ice, which then focussed the light down onto the beach like a prism. Sometimes everything just comes together to create something special, and I believe this was one of those times.

My next selected image is of the iconic Skógafoss waterfall in Iceland (below). I have scores of similar images of these falls now, but I really like the light on this one. The light above the falls seems to be spilling into the photograph, and there was so much spray that it caused highlighted the rock formation along the right side of the frame, which I also like.

Skógafoss (Falls)

Skógafoss (Falls)

This was a one second exposure with an ND8 filter on. I sometimes go a bit faster for waterfalls, but one second registers a lot of movement and the mist around the basin of the falls is really nice at this shutter speed, so this is probably my favorite Skógafoss photo to date.

My next selection is this photograph of the Choshi Ohtaki falls in the Oirase mountain stream area of Aomori, the northern-most prefecture of Honshu, the main island of Japan (below). When I first spoke about this image along with the other shot of these falls a few months ago, I think I preferred the other version from a lower angle, but now,  this one seems to appeal to me more, probably because there is more fall color in the image than the other version.

Choushi Ohtaki Waterfall (Higher Perspective)

Choushi Ohtaki Waterfall (Higher Perspective)

This is a 0.8 of a second exposure, again, a little longer than you need for a waterfall image, but what you need isn’t always what you want. I just like the really ethereal feel of flowing water like this, and there’s still a little bit of texture left. Just the balance I like for my waterfall photographs.

You might also remember this shot from that recent episode, of the wooden jetty out the back of a little cafe on the Towada Lake near the Oirase mountain stream. Another long exposure, this time at 3 minutes 40 seconds. The cloud on the other side of the lake was snow cloud, and the wind picked up buffeting my camera and leaving water droplets on my lens during this exposure, but I was able to remove most of them in Lightroom, and this became my favorite of a handful of long exposure from this evening (below).

Towada Lake Jetty 2014

Towada Lake Jetty 2014

As I mentioned last week, when I submitted this and another version to Offset, the stock agency that I work with, they rejected this one for the other version, but that just makes me like this one all the more. Really, the more I shoot, the more I want my own sensibilities to govern my likes and dislikes. I see no reason to change how I feel about an image based on what other people think. It’s my art, and it should stay that way. I really want to be true to myself, and my heart.

Of course, I’m not saying that you should make all of your editing decisions in a vacuum. The roll of your trusted critic is vitally important. When editing down sets of images, part of my finalisation process, is to get my wife to look through them. She’s not a photographer but she has a great eye, and she’s close enough to me that she knows she can give me some harsh feedback, and because I trust what she says, I generally listen.

You might recall this next image too, from episode 450 about productive respites, when I mentioned that this image ended up being kind of an homage image, as it reminds me very respectfully of Edward Weston’s Pepper No. 30. I have had an incredibly busy year, and really haven’t had a chance to get out with my camera much other than when I’m on tour, and I shot this on a well-earned break afternoon in my local park. Black and white flowers aren’t something that necessarily spring to mind, but I’ve been doing more and more over the last few years, and really enjoy this ongoing project of mine.

Dahlia #3

Dahlia #3

Mother and Child

Mother and Child

Finally, here’s a photograph of a mother snow monkey nursing her baby, from a recent visit to the snow monkeys on a private tour that I ran for four great clients from Singapore in December (right).

On our third day, the snow really set in, and this mother and child were sat on the wall of the hot spring bath for quite a while. I ended up with scores of images of this pair, but this is one of my favorites.

The baby didn’t look up that often, so having this eye contact here was nice, and I just love that look in the mother’s eyes as she seems to be just bearing the cold, and you can almost feel the love for the child. I have no idea how much these snow monkeys feel. I doubt that anyone does, but when you see them like this, it’s incredibly special. I love every moment that I’m able to spend with these very special animals.

In fact, I simply love every moment that I’m able to spend making my living with a camera in my hand. Looking back on the year, I spent a lot of time doing other work.

It’s all good of course and I’m happy with how I prioritized my time, but it really makes me grateful even more for the time that I’m able to actually make photographs rather than being behind my desk.

Next year, I’m hoping to hire an assistant, that can help not only with photography activities, but with back office tasks as well. I’m at the point now where I am becoming my own bottleneck, and it’s now a high priority task, to bring someone else on board, although that task itself is going to be pretty time consuming, I’m sure.

Anyway, that’s it. My 2014 Top Ten photographs. I hope you’ve enjoyed looking through them with me. I’m starting my first winter tour of 2015 tomorrow, my Hokkaido Landscape Photography Adventure. Unless something miraculous happens during the first week, I will probably be skipping an episode next week, but I’ll be back in two weeks time with an update. If I am able to post a few photos from the tour in a blog post, I will, so do check in, or subscribe to the RSS feed if you use an RSS reader.


Show Notes

Music by Martin Bailey


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Reflecting on 2008 and 2009 Want-To-Do List (Podcast 169)

Reflecting on 2008 and 2009 Want-To-Do List (Podcast 169)

Here we are at the end of 2008, and I thought once again, it would be a good time to look back at the year, and see what went well, and what I didn’t get to. Having been a pretty tough year in many respects, it’s definitely not all good, but let’s look at my 2008 anyway, and then we’ll see what I am want to do in 2009. Note too that I’ll be bringing you my 2008 top 10 image list next week. There are a few days left in 2008, and I’ll be out shooting, so there may be a few last minute winners still to come in.


First today, let’s think about what I said I was going to do in 2008, and see whether or not I got to it, then we’ll take a look at the ten things that I want to do in 2009. One thing that I started to do, but haven’t really continued uploading images to Stock Photography sites. The first reason that I stopped doing this is time. This really took a lot more time than I’m prepared to spend to actually upload my images to multiple Web sites. The other thing is that one of the sites that I started to get involved with need tax forms for the US, or more specifically a form saying that I am not a US Tax payer, and I just could not be bothered to fill this out. I need to do it at some point, but really find this sort of thing a pain, especially when some sites require them, and others don’t. The other reason if I’m honest is that despite uploading a fair few images to a number of sites they just aren’t selling. I know that to make any money in Stock Photography you have to really upload a lot of images, and also I’m not really shooting stock photography, I’m shooting fine art photography in the most part, and it is obviously not appealing to the customers of these agencies. I’ve actually sold more stock from people finding my images on my own Web site this year, as I seem to be in good books with Google. I will revisit this at some point, but it really requires a bit more work than I think I can put into this right now, so it’s off even the back burner now, probably in a Tupperware bowl in the back of the fridge.

Another thing that I wanted to do and did not get to is a calendar. This too just fell by the way, due to other responsibilities. The priority just wasn’t high enough to win my time over other things, and still isn’t. I’ll revisit this at some point, but not for 2009.

The Hokkaido Workshop of course went ahead, and was a great success. We’re now moving towards the bigger and better 2009 Winter Wonderland Workshop, and I’m really looking forward to it. Unfortunately, again due to time and lack of organization on my part, I wasn’t able to advertize in some US magazines, which is what I wanted to do, and so I couldn’t generate quite as much interest as I’d hoped, and the current global economy has really taken its toll. A number of people have mailed saying that they had planned to join, but simply can’t now, with the economy being as it is. This is quite understandable of course. Hopefully these people will be able to join in 2010 though, and I will most certainly be planning and getting the word out on that trip from pretty much as soon as I get back from the 2009 trip.

I didn’t shoot as much as I’d like in 2007, and although was determined to get out more in 2008, I actually ended up getting out less, which was very frustrating. Without trying to make excuses, my day-job has just been crazy for pretty much the whole year. We moved offices at the end of 2007, which means that I was commuting by train across town for the first time since coming to Tokyo in 2000. That means automatically that I have to spend over an hour more in my daily commute. The work itself has been simply crazy too, doing lots of new work, which in itself is a good thing, but it mean spending a lot of time trying to figure out how to do more with less budget, etc. Good work, but basically kept me very busy.

Then, to really put a nail in the coffin for my photography in 2008, I decided to do something in the latter half of the year that really just took up a lot of weekends in preparation. I can’t tell you how frustrating it was to know that the mountains in Nagano were in flaming autumn colour while I was stuck at home doing paperwork. Forgive me for not saying what I was doing just yet, as I don’t want to jinx it, but it took a lot of time. Hopefully it will be worth it in the end though and I will certainly tell you what it’s all about if it goes well. Anyway, all in all, for the most part, I’ve either been physically working more, or just working so hard that when I get home, I’ve collapsed on the sofa, rather than planning trips etc. I’ve also simply found it impossible to get up early most weekends, to get out for first light, which is one of the things that I most like to do. This has led to a lot of self-kicking and frustration, and really almost led to some mental illness towards the end of the year here. I think I’m out of that though, and hopefully next year things will start to look up, and I’ll find myself with more weekends and some time to take longer excursions to some nice spots for some quality work in the field.

It hasn’t been all bad though, by a long way. One thing that I am very happy about, is that I actually did more photography work in 2008 than any previous year. Consequently, I made a lot more money doing photography in 2008 than any other year so far too. I’m really hoping that I can keep the momentum going here.

I actually recorded a Focus Ring episode from midnight last Friday, and in that, I spoke a little about the fact that I am also very happy with my digital workflow right now. Things have just really come together, especially in the last few months, with the help of a few third party plug-ins to enhance Lightroom just enough to make my workflow as good as perfect. For more details on this, listen to the latest episode of the Focus Ring podcast.

One other good thing is that I finally towards the end of 2008 made the time to put together a book of our 2008 Hokkaido Workshop photos. The book is 96 pages, and contains 12 images from 4 of the 5 participants plus 12 of my own, and I also included a number of images of the posy, as we made our way around Hokkaido having the time of our lives. The book is available on Blurb.com if you want to order your own copy. I’ll put a link in the show-notes, but if you search for my name on Blurb you’ll see the book there. I had been a little nonplused about the quality, but having sent Blurb some photos of the book they agreed that this was sub-standard, and have refunded me the cost of my first copy. I’ve trusted them and put in a larger order now, though some of them I’ve specified the premium paper, to see how much of a difference it makes. If it is much better, I’ll change the settings so that the book is available with Premium paper from now on.

Anyway, let’s move on and take a look at what I’m currently thinking about 2009 now. One thing I’m learning though is that my energy levels do apparently have limits. If I keep on going the way I have been over this last year, I think I’ll make myself ill, so I am going to continue to try to streamline a few things. I’m not going to commit to do these things, but I really want to get to most of this. I’m also considering joining our good friend Landon Michaelson on his 2009 project, but I’m not sure if I can fit it in yet. I’m thinking seriously about it though. In the meantime, let’s go through my 2009 “want-to-do” list. I’ll get to as much of this as I can, some of which will depend on how much I can streamline a few other parts of my life.

  1. Plan the 2010 Hokkaido Workshop as soon as possible on my return from the February 2009 trip and start to work on some real advertizing.
  2. Try to find a venue for a show of my work. This could be either paid for by me, or sponsored. I don’t really care, but I seriously want to do a show here in Tokyo.
  3. I want to do a book, ideally one that will accompany the show, and therefore be sold at the show.
  4. I want to offer a few loose page fine art print portfolios of my work. I’ve been toying with this idea for some time now, but the delay is getting silly. I’m still looking for a good presentation method, but really need to just make a decision and get something available.
  5. I want to do more paid portrait work. This may be preceded by putting together a nice web page or site to help get the word out that I’m available for this kind of work and then of course some other marketing activity. I’m under no delusion that Web presence alone is enough to make this successful.
  6. I want to read more. I have picked up a number of great photography related books in 2008 that I still haven’t read. They are haunting me from my bookshelf.
  7. I want to get up to speed on all of the applications in the Adobe CS4 Design Premium Suite. I’ve been playing with Illustrator a little, which I used years ago, but I really want to become proficient with In Design, Flash Professional, Dreamweaver, Fireworks and Acrobat Pro as well. I need to make time to get stuck into some good tutorials and online training.
  8. I’m determined to do more social networking. I’ve finally this last month started to upload images to Flickr, and am starting to spend a little more time in that community, making connections and some new friends. If you’re on Flickr by the way, add me as a contact. My flickr name is martin_bailey. There’s a link to my Flickr Photostream on the top page at martinbaileyphotography.com too.
  9. Whatever happens in my professional life, both photographer and non-photography related I want to make sure that I always have time each week to continue to do this Podcast. It helps to keep myself in check and I’ve made a lot of new friends through this, and so I really want to continue to do it as long as possible. Right now this Podcast is not on the list of candidates to streamline my life.

10. The most important thing for me, that I must continue to achieve through 2009 is to really feel that my photography is progressing. As always, our newest work should be our best and even if I don’t get to photograph as often as I’d like, I want the photography that I do to be quality work that I’m happy with.

So, that’s the list as of today. One last update before we finish is that I have once again done a bit of gallery pruning. As I promised at the end of 2007, I have been through my gallery again at the end of this year and removed all the images that no longer match either my creative vision or my personally perceived quality standards. Some have had to stay, because I talked about them in a Podcast at some point, but I have tried to be as ruthless as possible. Despite making a concerted effort to allow my images to breathe a little after shooting them, so as not to upload them through the excitement of the shoot, over the merits of the image, I found that there was a handful of images from this year that I removed too. Two of these were macro shots that I uploaded intending to talk about in a Podcast that I never got to, but a few others snuck in more because of the excitement of the shoot, or some new gear. It was only a handful though, so I guess I should be happy, after all I have been much more careful in what I’ve uploaded through 2008, and in total I have removed just 28 images from the gallery this year. Nowhere near as high a proportion as last year, but that was the first time I’d done it in four or five years. Still, it felt good to cut away some of the lesser offerings, and make room for some more work in 2009.

And with that, we close off the 2008 Podcasting year, and as I said at the start, there are a few more photography days left, so I’ll be bringing you my 2008 top 10 images next week.

So I want to wish you all a Happy New Year, and hope that 2009 brings you every success, in the areas that you want to be successful in. I’d also like to thank you for listening through the year, and for those of you that contribute to the community at martinbaileyphotography.com, thanks for that too. I’d also like to thank the moderators Marisa, Landon, Forrest and Dave. You guys do a great job, and really, really help with your work in the Photography Forum and on the mbpgalleries member’s Web site. I would like to thank all of the other major contributors to the Forum, but I’d probably miss someone out that also does so much, and I’d hate to do that, so just a huge thanks to all of you. You’re a great bunch to hang out with. Even if you don’t get actively involved in the forums, if you’re listening to this, you’re part of the community, so once again, a very Happy New Year to you, and I’ll be back in 2009, with more Martin Bailey Photography Podcasts. Bye for now.


Show Notes

Find our Hokkaido 2008 Winter Wonderland Workshop book on blurb here: http://www.blurb.com/user/MartinBailey

Here’s a link to my Flickr Photostream. Take a look and make me a contact: http://flickr.com/photos/martin_bailey/

The music in this Podcast was created and produced by UniqueTracks.


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Michael Rammell

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